Scientific dating of artifacts

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Universities that offer courses in archeometry offer these courses frequently as free choice for archeology students and these courses contain mainly a nonscientific overview over the possibilities that different scientific analyses offer to them.Another important subdiscipline of archaeometry is the study of artifacts.This can show how far the artifact has traveled and can indicate the existence of systems of exchange.Archaeometry has greatly influenced modern archaeology. Archaeologists can obtain significant additional data and information using these techniques, and archaeometry has the potential to revise the understanding of the past, for example, the "second radiocarbon revolution" significantly re-dated European prehistory in the 1960s, compared to the "first radiocarbon revolution" from 1949.

Chronometric dating, also known as chronometry or absolute dating, is any archaeological dating method that gives a result in calendar years before the present time.Archaeometrists have used a variety of methods to analyze artifacts, either to determine more about their composition, or to determine their provenance, these techniques include: Lead, strontium and oxygen isotope analysis can also test human remains to estimate the diets and even the birthplaces of a study's subjects.Provenance analysis has the potential to determine the original source of the materials used, for example, to make a particular artifact. Which according to Wikipedia is: Radiocarbon dating, or carbon dating, is a radiometric dating method that uses the naturally occurring radioisotope carbon-14 (14C) to determine the age of carbonaceous materials up to about 60,000 years. uncalibrated, radiocarbon ages are usually reported in radiocarbon years "Before Present" (BP), "Present" being defined as AD 1950.Such raw ages can be calibrated to give calendar dates.

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