Benefits of dating a younger man

Rated 4.93/5 based on 878 customer reviews

Getting awkward questions (wait, do you know each other?! I find it difficult to explain to people how my relationship came to be.

I’m often asked how we met—and not in a giddy kind of way (it’s more like concern).

From what I’ve gathered, a man in his 20s is more likely to blow his cash on frivolous things, while men in their 30s and are likely to save money for the future or for experiences, like a romantic vacation (wink, wink). “He texted me an hour after I texted him.” “What should I text him back? I can still remember the days when I’d utter those words and essentially have an anxiety attack every time my phone buzzed and it was a guy my own age I’d been casually seeing.

When I first started dating my boyfriend, it threw me off when he didn’t text me, but—wait for it— instead.

I get the impression that people outside my inner circle wonder if I’m lying and that maybe he picked me up at a hotel bar or something cliché like that.

Other inquire whether I was purposely seeking an older man when I met him.

What helped me most was talking about how wonderful he is leading up to their meet and asking my older sister to talk to them too.

Anyone who’s been in a serious long-term relationship knows the journey isn’t without certain challenges, and when you’re dating an older man—we’re talking a decade or more—things can get even trickier.

I know this firsthand, as I’m 25 years old, and I’ve been dating an older guy nearly 15 years my senior for almost four years.

Persistence also takes confidence—my boyfriend extended three invitations before I finally agreed to get coffee with him.

As Aaliyah once said, “If at first you don’t succeed, dust yourself off and try again.” Older men know this. I won’t lie: It can be annoying at times dating someone who has “been there/done that,” but it can also be helpful when your partner can use his experiences to guide you.

Leave a Reply